Can you replace pages in your will?

Written by Robert Ray

Robert Ray handles inheritance disputes of all kinds. He takes cases throughout Texas.

If you have a will and you decide to make changes to it, can you take out a page and replace it?

If you replace pages and then re-execute the will with the formalities required of a will, you can make changes.  However, if you just make changes to your will such as:

  1. Replacing pages;
  2. Typing additional provisions on the will; or
  3. Adding additional pages.

Then the will must be re-executed with all of the formalities required of a will.  As stated elsewhere in this blog, if the will is not wholly in the handwriting of the testator, the formalities required are that:

  1. The will be signed by the testator or someone by his direction and in his presence;
  2. The will be attested to by two credible witnesses who sign the will;
    • in their own handwriting;
    • in the presence of the testator.

If you don’t execute the altered will with the formalities above, then the document is not a will and will not be admitted to probate.  I recently read a case where the testator was in the habit of taking his will apart and replacing pages whenever he wanted to make changes to it.  Apparently, he changed his will frequently.  The will was denied probate because he did not re-execute the altered will with the required formalities.  He died intestate, without a will.  Something that he obviously did not want to do since he had gone to the trouble of creating a will.

Copyright by Robert Ray a Texas inheritance attorney. The foregoing information is general in nature and does not apply to every fact situation. If you are concerned about inheritance laws, inheritance rights, have a family inheritance dispute, a property dispute or want information about contesting a will and need an inheritance lawyer, we can help. Please go to our main site www.texasinheritance.com and use the contact form to contact us today. We are Texas inheritance lawyers and would love to learn about your case and there is no fee for the initial consultation.

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Robert Ray

Board Certified, Personal Injury Trial Law — Texas Board of Legal Specialization. We handle cases all across Texas. Our principal office is in Lantana, Texas (DFW area).

Robert Ray is a Texas attorney who handles inheritance disputes

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Inheritance disputes involve someone who has taken advantage of the elderly. These cases are complicated and most often, but not always, involve outsiders. We represent you knowing that these inheritance disputes are private and painful family matters. We know this is a stressful time for you. We strive to obtain the quickest and best results possible so that you can get this troubling episode behind you.

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